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LHP's Training Division Expands Course Offerings

Intro to engine Performance.png

LHP is excited to announce Intro to Engine Performance, an addition to our already successful, industry-recognized, 6-

week bootcamps. The new bootcamp, located in San Antonio, Texas, offers participants an intensive 6-week, hands-on course on Engine Performance.

Participants in the bootcamp will gain the understanding and basics of turbocharged, gasoline direct (GDI) engines and interpreting cylinder pressure signals. The course is designed to give students a look into managing real-world situations and working environments. This class is geared toward software engineers, electrical engineers, and mechanical engineers who are ready to expand their skills using a gasoline direct injection engine.


Course highlights include:

  • Fuel Injector Control Waveform Development
  • Operating a throttle using LabVIEW
  • Tuning PID Controllers for Boost Pressure, Throttle Control, and others
  • Engine Control Module (ECM)

The inaugural training will be offered in San Antonio, Texas, and delivered by LHPU certified trainers. The course kicks off October 30th and will run through December 7th.

Zach McClellan, President of LHPU- “LHPU is excited to offer a very unique course in San Antonio, Texas that brings together tools from National Instruments in real-life projects from the automotive industry.  We are pleased to help build qualified engineers who learn ways to reduce emissions on a combustion engine and ,ultimately, provide a better planetary future for generations to come.”

The introduction of the bootcamp comes after the opening of our San Antonio facility, where LHP’s business unit, LHP Technology Solutions resides.

LHP plans to expand overall operations into the Texas region as they continue offering engineering and technology solutions. Automobile and engine technology continue to grow in complexity and are trending toward autonomous controls and functional safety.

For more information regarding the bootcamp, visit LHPU.com  or e-mail questions to LHPUtraining@lhpes.com.


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